Lizzyboo

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Meditations

I was scrolling through my Instagram, which is primarily pictures of Chicago, my cats, my bike (and bike commute), my Fluevogs, cocktails, coffee and monthly karaoke with my friends. There are some airport shots, now and again, the odd concert or trip to the courthouse or a restaurant.

And suddenly, I was completely overwhelmingly pleased with the Ding an Sich of my life.

Except I think I’ve killed my air garden.

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Wonder Woman’s Secret Past

The Wonder Woman Family Museum occupies a one-room bunker beneath a two-story house on a hilly street in Bethel, Connecticut. It contains more than four thousand objects. Their arrangement is higgledy-piggledy. There are Wonder Woman lunchboxes, face masks, coffee mugs, a Frisbee, napkins, record-players, T-shirts, bookends, a trailer-hitch cover, plates and cups, pencils, kites, and, near the floor, a pressed-aluminum cake mold, her breasts like cupcakes. A cardboard stand holds Pez dispensers, red, topped with Wonder Woman’s head. Wonder Woman backpacks hang from hooks; sleeping bags are rolled up on a shelf. On a ten-foot-wide stage whose backdrop depicts ancient Greece—the Parthenon atop the Acropolis—Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons, a life-size mannequin wearing sandals and a toga, sits on a throne. To her left stands her daughter, Princess Diana, a mannequin dressed as Wonder Woman: a golden tiara on top of a black wig; a red bustier embossed with an American eagle, its wings spread to form the letters “WW”; a blue miniskirt with white stars; bracelets that can stop bullets; a golden lasso strapped to her belt; and, on her feet, super-kinky knee-high red boots. Nearby, a Wonder Woman telephone rests on a glass shelf. The telephone is unplugged.

Superman débuted in 1938, Batman in 1939, Wonder Woman in 1941. She was created by William Moulton Marston, a psychologist with a Ph.D. from Harvard. A press release explained, “ ‘Wonder Woman’ was conceived by Dr. Marston to set up a standard among children and young people of strong, free, courageous womanhood; to combat the idea that women are inferior to men, and to inspire girls to self-confidence and achievement in athletics, occupations and professions monopolized by men” because “the only hope for civilization is the greater freedom, development and equality of women in all fields of human activity.” Marston put it this way: “Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world.”

The much cited difficulties regarding putting Wonder Woman on film—Wonder Woman isn’t big enough, and neither are Gal Gadot’s breasts—aren’t chiefly about Wonder Woman, or comic books, or superheroes, or movies. They’re about politics. Superman owes a debt to science fiction, Batman to the hardboiled detective. Wonder Woman’s debt is to feminism. She’s the missing link in a chain of events that begins with the woman-suffrage campaigns of the nineteen-tens and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later. Wonder Woman is so hard to put on film because the fight for women’s rights has gone so badly.

For emphasis: “Wonder Woman is so hard to put on film because the fight for women’s rights has gone so badly.”

(Source: dbvictoria, via babbledevice)

69,555 notes

glamdamnit:

My sister asked if the events of “The Labyrinth” are meant to be Sarah dreaming, or are they real? Although my primary reaction was that she shouldn’t put that much thought into any children’s movie (or any instance of David Bowie in tight pants), I’d like to take this opportunity to put so much thought into this children’s movie, that it’ll blow your mind.
So why is David Bowie kidnapping a child from an underage Jennifer Connelley?
In a time long long ago a sorcerer named Jareth fell in love with a girl named Sarah. Sarah’s father and step-mother would not let her marry Jareth because they wanted her to keep her, as a servant, to care for their other child. In a fit of rage Jareth kidnapped this other child and spirited it away to the fairy world. In this new world Jareth built a palace for his Sarah. He turned the spoiled child into a goblin, and kept it to be a servant.
Many stories of the fairy world tell us that time moves differently there than in our world (Rip Van Winkle for one). In the time it took for Jareth to build his kingdom, which he may have thought was little more than a few years, Sarah grew old and died.
Overcome by grief and addled by a lifetime spent in a strange world filled with monsters, Jareth goes mad. He refuses to believe that he has lost his love. He searches the mortal world from his castle, looking for her.
Sarah is Hebrew name. So, it is common, and has been in use for thousands and thousands of years. It does not take long (for him) to find a dark haired girl named Sarah, who has a younger sibling, and who feels that she is treated unfairly by her step mother. In a fit of rage he kidnaps this other child and spirits it away to the fairy world. Perhaps this new Sarah dies in the quest to find the child, perhaps she wins her sibling back and flees.
Jareth searches the mortal world from his from his castle, looking for her.  It does not take long to find a dark haired girl named Sarah…
This is how Jareth becomes the goblin king. Every goblin in the goblin city is a child Jareth has stolen, who was not recovered by a Sarah. (he told the current Sarah that Toby would become a goblin if she did not find him in time)
This is why he builds the maze. The magic bog, the junk yard of useless treasures, all tricks to slow Sarah down. Because if he can only have his Sarah for the time it takes for her to regain the stolen child, he will make it take as long as possible, keep her as long as possible.
This is why there exists in our world a book containing the story. Because it has happened before. So many times. At some point some lucky Sarah must have returned to our world to tell the story.
This is why when the most recent Sarah first meets Hoggle at the start of the labyrinth, and introduces herself; “I’m Sarah”, Hoggle responds “That’s what I figured.”
Because of course she’s Sarah.
They were all Sarah.

glamdamnit:

My sister asked if the events of “The Labyrinth” are meant to be Sarah dreaming, or are they real? Although my primary reaction was that she shouldn’t put that much thought into any children’s movie (or any instance of David Bowie in tight pants), I’d like to take this opportunity to put so much thought into this children’s movie, that it’ll blow your mind.

So why is David Bowie kidnapping a child from an underage Jennifer Connelley?

In a time long long ago a sorcerer named Jareth fell in love with a girl named Sarah. Sarah’s father and step-mother would not let her marry Jareth because they wanted her to keep her, as a servant, to care for their other child. In a fit of rage Jareth kidnapped this other child and spirited it away to the fairy world. In this new world Jareth built a palace for his Sarah. He turned the spoiled child into a goblin, and kept it to be a servant.

Many stories of the fairy world tell us that time moves differently there than in our world (Rip Van Winkle for one). In the time it took for Jareth to build his kingdom, which he may have thought was little more than a few years, Sarah grew old and died.

Overcome by grief and addled by a lifetime spent in a strange world filled with monsters, Jareth goes mad. He refuses to believe that he has lost his love. He searches the mortal world from his castle, looking for her.

Sarah is Hebrew name. So, it is common, and has been in use for thousands and thousands of years. It does not take long (for him) to find a dark haired girl named Sarah, who has a younger sibling, and who feels that she is treated unfairly by her step mother. In a fit of rage he kidnaps this other child and spirits it away to the fairy world. Perhaps this new Sarah dies in the quest to find the child, perhaps she wins her sibling back and flees.

Jareth searches the mortal world from his from his castle, looking for her.  It does not take long to find a dark haired girl named Sarah…

This is how Jareth becomes the goblin king. Every goblin in the goblin city is a child Jareth has stolen, who was not recovered by a Sarah. (he told the current Sarah that Toby would become a goblin if she did not find him in time)

This is why he builds the maze. The magic bog, the junk yard of useless treasures, all tricks to slow Sarah down. Because if he can only have his Sarah for the time it takes for her to regain the stolen child, he will make it take as long as possible, keep her as long as possible.

This is why there exists in our world a book containing the story. Because it has happened before. So many times. At some point some lucky Sarah must have returned to our world to tell the story.

This is why when the most recent Sarah first meets Hoggle at the start of the labyrinth, and introduces herself; “I’m Sarah”, Hoggle responds “That’s what I figured.”

Because of course she’s Sarah.

They were all Sarah.

(via mcmikenamara)

53,077 notes

A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up.

Stephen Scobie, on the Naropa Institute’s 1994 tribute to Allen Ginsberg  

Absences of women in history don’t “just happen,” they are made.

(via extraterrestris)

(Source: fuckyeahbeatniks, via babbledevice)

Filed under casualmisogyny everydaysexism historyiswrittenbypower

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Sigh

One of those stupidly literal symbolic dreams last night. But hey, at least this one did not lead to night-terror-sleep-paralysis (for once) and I woke up feeling mostly good about my choices in life with regard to people to care about.

Do really need to try harder to mend that one bridge, however.

Filed under dreams

3 notes

In conclusion, the idea that building 128 housing units on Diversey would be pushing the envelope into uncharted territories of congestion is simply a lie. In fact, the area was notably denser within very recent memory. And, of course, in the interim, the demand to live in this area has skyrocketed; median income family income is now well over $100,000 a year, or more than twice – and pushing three times – the metropolitan area average. Housing costs are correspondingly high. And Chicago’s housing policy has led to a situation in which fewer people are allowed to live there. Dear alderman, who have the power to approve this and other housing projects (and, while we’re at it, a rational inclusionary zoning ordinance): fix it, please.

Fun With Neighborhood Development Meetings | City Notes (via stephenboisvert)

BUT DEAR GOD, push the TOD that allows builders to reduce the number of parking spaces. If Broadway is really supposed to be a fucking designated pedestrian street, why are you not disincentivizing driving in East Lakeivew and emphasizing the #36, #22, #8, #151, #156, #77, #146 (and sometimes #134, #143, #135) and L over the parking?

And build some decent fucking bikelanes around here, please? Not just paint.

(via stephenboisvert)

11 notes

sciencefriday:

From SciArts producer Annie Minoff, who was in Linz last week for Ars Electronica:

Korean computer scientist Shin Seung Back and artist Kim Yong Hun collaborate on art projects that explore how computers “read” faces. 

For “Cat or Human,” they collected human faces recognized as cat faces by a human face-detection algorithm, and cat faces recognized as human faces by a cat face-detection algorithm.

Credit: Shinseungback Kimyonghun

(via mecuellar)

Filed under cats people science computers

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For the First Time, I’m a Hipster

U2’s tone-deaf publicist responding to the displeasure of people who did not want Apple adding things to their iTunes without asking first:

That’s kind of a hipster—you know—tsunami of whingeing because the biggest band in the world has put a free album in their box.

I mean, I have not actually accessed my iTunes account in years, but apparently I am a hipster for not wanting digital clutter or in some way despicable because U2’s beneficence failed to make me interested in their new album.

In the end, digital clutter is still clutter. I mean, I’m still annoyed that I can’t uninstall NFL Mobile from my phone.